A | B | C | D | E | F |G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | R | S | T | U | V | W

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Routine activities that people tend do everyday without needing assistance. Some examples of basic ADLs are eating, bathing, dressing, toileting, transferring (walking) and continence.
A branch of secondary health care in which a patient receives active but short-term treatment for a severe injury or episode of illness, an urgent medical condition or during recovery from surgery. Generally speaking, an acute care facility is a hospital.
An option for older adults who may benefit from socialization, adult day care provides support services, recreation and meals in a supervised social setting. Adult day care programs enable residents to attend the program during the day and return home in the evening.
Workouts like running or swimming that condition the heart and lungs by increasing the efficiency of the body's oxygen use.
The AlterG® uses technology patented by NASA to apply a comfortable lifting force to the body, allowing unweighting of up to 80 percent of a user's body weight. This allows users to experience pain-free exercise and movement. In addition, the AlterG's design encourages proper gait by allowing users to watch their own feet on a camera. Because users are supported by the AlterG, the risk of falling is removed.
A progressive form of pre-senile dementia. The first symptom is impaired memory, which is followed by impaired thought and speech and, finally, complete helplessness. Decreased memory, reasoning and ability to care for oneself make a person unable to function.
The ability to walk and move about freely (see Ambulatory).
A term which specifically means "able to walk," but which in health care refers to a person who is not bedridden. A person who requires a wheelchair is still considered ambulatory.
An individual who has had a limb removed.
A decrease in the number of red blood cells, or, less than the normal quantity of hemoglobin (found in red blood cells) in the blood.
Pressure, tightness or pain in one's chest, arm, neck, back or jaw due to an insufficient supply of blood to the heart.
Partial or total loss of the ability to articulate ideas or comprehend spoken or written language, resulting from damage to the brain caused by injury or disease.
An underwater treadmill system that uses water to provide resistance throughout a range of motions within a very protective environment. The main components of an AquaCiser are an exercise chamber, a water reservoir and a control console. In order to tailor an individualized treatment plan, qualified therapists use the console's touch-screen control panel to adjust temperature, speed, belt direction and water depth.
Therapeutic rehabilitation that is performed in the water to lessen the amount of weight placed on joints.
The use of making art as a therapeutic method to improve and enhance physical, mental and emotional well-being.
The inflammation of the body's joints, causing pain, swelling and difficulty in body movement.
A residential care setting that combines housing, support services and health care for elderly or disabled adults who require supervision or assistance with activities of daily living. It is the second level of care in the continuum of care for people, after independent living and before skilled nursing care.
Clogging, narrowing and hardening of the body's large arteries and medium-sized blood vessels. Atherosclerosis can lead to stroke, heart attack, eye problems and kidney problems.

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A treatment for obesity, addressing the cause, prevention and condition.
Patient treatment tables with features that make them also a therapy and assessment platform. Depending on the model, a Barihab™ is able to transform into several rehabilitation and assessment tools, including adjustable headrest, seatbelt, backrest and other tools, providing safety for both the patient and therapist.
A manufacturer of medical equipment, including the Biodex Balance System SD, BioStep and the Biodex Unweighing System.
A balance testing and training tool. Trained therapists use this system to increase a patient's overall balance, reduce fall risk, strengthen the core muscles and provide overall stability.
The technique of using monitoring devices to furnish information regarding an autonomic bodily function, such as heart rate or blood pressure, in an attempt to gain some voluntary control over that function.
A measure of the amount of calcium contained in a certain volume of bone. Bone density measurements may be used to diagnose osteoporosis, to see how well osteoporosis treatments are working and to figure out how likely bones are to break.

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The diminishing of pigment in hair, which produces a range of colors from normal to white or gray.
Therapy focused on recovery and treatment of heart related ailments and conditions.
A painful condition that occurs when the tendons in the wrist are inflamed after being aggravated by repetitive movements, resulting in nerve pressure and pain.
A person who has attained the age of 100 years or more (also see Supercentenarian).
A sister company to Life Care Centers of America, Century Park Associates operates more than 50 independent and assisted living communities in 21 states.
A medical professional who helps patients or clients with health care needs under the supervision of a Registered Nurse (RN) or a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN).
A wound care treatment developed by a board-certified plastic/reconstructive surgeon offering a simple and effective treatment while limiting risk to both patients and therapists.

CMS

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services responsible for the administration of several federal health care programs, including Medicare and Medicaid (see CMS rating system).
CMS created the Five-Star Quality Rating System to help consumers, their families and caregivers compare nursing homes more easily. It also helps identify areas about which potential customers may want to ask questions. The Nursing Home Compare website now features a quality rating system that gives each nursing home a rating of between 1 and 5 stars.
Therapeutic rehabilitation focused on deficits in the brain's management of information and the way it is conveyed through language.
A surgical procedure where a portion of the large intestine is brought through the abdominal wall to carry stool out of the body.
Starchy foods that are good sources of energy and nutrients, such as bread, rice, pasta and grains.
Providing all levels of care, including skilled nursing, rehabilitation, assisted living and independent living, at one location. A continuum-of-care campus allows residents to easily move between different levels of care depending on their care needs.
A facility providing lodging and 24-hour skilled nursing services to those requiring post-acute care due to decreased ability to perform activities of daily living. Services provided range from long-term care to short-term rehabilitation. Sometimes called a nursing home or skilled nursing facility. It is the third level of care in the continuum of care for people, after independent living and assisted living care.
Medications that reduce inflammation in the airways leading to the lungs (bronchial tubes). They also decrease the mucous made by the bronchial tubes and make breathing easier.

D Back to Top

The progressive loss of mental facilities including short- and long-term memory. This condition is characterized by mental disorientation and impaired judgment; it typically has an adverse effect on emotions and learning capabilities, and it may cause functional incontinence.
A life-long disease marked by elevated levels of sugar in the blood. It can be caused by too little insulin (a chemical produced by the pancreas to regulate blood sugar), resistance to insulin or both.
A process of filtering and removing waste products from the bloodstream.
Difficulty in swallowing or inability to swallow.
Impairment of speech and verbal comprehension, especially when associated with brain injury. Sometimes, it is called dysphrasia.
Impairment of speech and verbal comprehension, especially when associated with brain injury. Sometimes, it is called dysphasia.

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The elicitation of muscle contraction using electric impulses (often called neuromuscular electrical stimulation). NMES has received increasing attention in the last few years because it has the potential to serve as: a strength training tool for healthy patients and athletes; a rehabilitation and preventive tool for partially or totally immobilized patients; a testing tool for evaluating the neural and/or muscular function; a post-exercise recovery tool for athletes.
The delivery of nutrients in liquid form directly into the stomach, duodenum or jejunum.
The administrators of care facilities operated by Life Care Centers of America are called executive directors. EDs are educated, trained and licensed individuals who oversee the general administration and operations of the facility.

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A practice which allows patients who are NPO (unable to take fluids or foods through the mouth) or who are on thickened liquids to have ice chips/ water between meals when following specific guidelines. The free water protocol is not appropriate for all patients.

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The pattern of movement of the limbs of humans during locomotion (walking) over a solid surface.
Specific Life Care Centers of America locations designed and built primarily to care for people with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders throughout the entire course of the disease.
Care for ailments and conditions relating to the stomach or the intestines.
The branch of medicine that focuses on health promotion and the prevention and treatment of disease and disability in later life stages.
Any health condition having characteristics of, or involving a gland. A gland is a group of cells, or an organ, that makes and secretes substances for use elsewhere in the body or for elimination from the body.
A disease characterized by increased pressure within the eyeball, leading to gradual vision impairment and, sometimes, blindness if not diagnosed and treated.

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A type of medical insurance coverage that specifically states which doctors and medical institutions patients may use and which medical tests and procedures will be paid for by the HMO.
The body's painful reaction when an area of heart muscle dies or is permanently damaged because of an inadequate supply of blood and oxygen to that area.
A general term that relates to many heart conditions. Coronary artery disease, the most common form of heart disease, occurs when the arteries that carry blood to the heart muscle are narrowed or blocked. This can lead to angina or heart attack.
A medical condition where blood pressure is chronically elevated. Also called hypertension.
A unit made up of proteins and fats that carries cholesterol to the liver. The liver removes cholesterol from the body. HDL is commonly called "good" cholesterol. High levels of HDL cholesterol can lower the risk of heart disease (see Low-density lipoprotein).
Caring for an aging or impaired person in his or her home by providing homemaking, meal preparation, shopping, transportation and assistance with activities of daily living.
When a health care professional tours a home and offers suggestions for modifications that will ensure a smooth transition for a patient returning home.
An amino acid that is found in the body. When levels of homocysteine are too high, there is an increase in risk factor for heart disease, even in people with normal cholesterol.
A specialized program for individuals who have a terminal condition. Highly trained staff care for the resident as well as the family members, helping them through this emotional period.
The taking of water into the body.
A medical condition where blood pressure is chronically elevated. Also called high blood pressure.

I Back to Top

The involuntary excretion of urine or feces.
A residential care setting that combines housing and limited support services for elderly or disabled adults who require minimal assistance with the activities of daily living. It is the first level of care in the continuum of care for people, before assisted living and then skilled nursing care.
Therapy that requires admission to a facility for at least one overnight stay.
A level of care for nonacutely ill, disabled or elderly individuals that may be, but does not necessarily need to be, delivered by a skilled professional.
The administration of specialty pharmaceuticals directly into a vein.

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A not-for-profit organization governed by a body of professionals, consumers and advocates. It was founded in 1951 to promote high standards in patient care and safety. Health care organizations that are accredited by The Joint Commission receive a gold seal, signifying their voluntary commitment to upholding the highest standard of excellence.
A procedure of orthopedic surgery in which the arthritic or dysfunctional joint surface is replaced with an orthopedic prosthesis. Joint replacement is considered as a treatment when severe joint pain or dysfunction is not alleviated by less-invasive therapies.

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Any one of several chronic conditions that are caused by damage to the cells of the kidney (see Renal disease).

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One of the most widely practiced treatments for the speech communication and physical/occupational therapy needs of individuals with Parkinson's disease.
One of the most widely practiced treatments for the physical/occupational therapy needs of individuals with Parkinson's disease. It is used to promote high-amplitude movements in Parkinson's patients.
One of the most widely practiced treatments for the speech communication needs of individuals with Parkinson's disease. It focuses on increasing vocal loudness and has an intensive approach of one month.
A nurse who cares for people who are sick, injured, convalescent, or disabled under the direction of registered nurses and physicians. The term licensed vocational nurse (LVN) is used in California and Texas.
A subsidiary of Life Care Centers of America placing on-site physicians at skilled nursing facilities across the country.
A partial weight-bearing gait therapy device promoting the generation of normal gait patterns and training posture, balance and locomotion (walking) while keeping the patient safely supported.
A range of health and personal assistance services provided either at home, in the community or in skilled nursing facilities for individuals with long-term disabilities.
A unit made up of proteins and fats that carries cholesterol in the body. High levels of LDL cholesterol cause a buildup of cholesterol in the arteries. Commonly called "bad" cholesterol, high levels of LDL can increase the risk of heart disease (see High-density lipoprotein).
A condition of localized fluid retention and tissue swelling caused by a compromised lymphatic system. Tissues with lymphedema are at risk of infection. Sometimes called a lymphatic obstruction.

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Federal program that covers long-term nursing home care for individuals who are financially unable to do so and who meet state medical requirements.
A physician licensed to practice in the state and duly dedicated to the delivery of competent, comprehensive and compassionate medical care to all residents residing in a skilled nursing facility.
The U.S. federal government plan for paying certain hospital and medical expenses for those who qualify, primarily those more than 65 years of age.
Medicare regulations allow patients to be readmitted within a 30-day period, known as the Medicare window, without needing to be rehospitalized.
The most dangerous of all skin cancers, melanoma is characterized by the uncontrolled growth of pigment-producing cells (melanocytes). If detected in the early stages, melanoma can often be treated successfully, but in the later stages it can spread to other organs and may result in death.
Also known as disseminated sclerosis or encephalomyelitis disseminata, MS is an inflammatory disease in which the insulating covers of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are damaged.
A form of soft-tissue therapy used to treat somatic dysfunction and relieve the resulting pain and restriction of motion.
A medical device manufacturer of Myoelectric Prosthetic Technology used to restore motion in individuals with neurological injuries.

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A specialty of medicine that concerns itself with the study of normal kidney function, kidney problems, the treatment of kidney problems and renal replacement therapy (dialysis and kidney transplantation).
The elicitation of muscle contraction using electric impulses. NMES has received increasing attention in the last few years because it has the potential to serve as: a strength training tool for healthy subjects and athletes; a rehabilitation and preventive tool for partially or totally immobilized patients; a testing tool for evaluating the neural and/or muscular function; and a post-exercise recovery tool for athletes.

NPO

"Nil per os" is a medical instruction meant to withhold oral food and fluids from a patient for various reasons. The Latin phrase translates to "nothing through the mouth."
Also known as an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN), a nurse practitioner is an RN with additional education and competencies in a specific field.
A facility providing lodging and 24-hour skilled nursing services to those requiring post-acute care due to decreased ability to perform activities of daily living. Services provided range from long-term care to short-term rehabilitation. Sometimes called a skilled nursing facility or convalescent home. It is the third level of care in the continuum of care for people, after independent living and assisted living care.
A medical device manufacturer of recumbent cross-trainers, which combine lower and upper body movement for a full body workout.

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A therapist who evaluates the self-care, work and leisure skills of a person. OTs plan and implement social and interpersonal activities to develop, restore and/or maintain the person's ability to accomplish activities of daily living and necessary occupational tasks.
Certified assistants who work under the direction of occupational therapists in treating patients with injuries, illnesses or disabilities through the therapeutic use of everyday activities. They help these patients develop, recover and improve the skills needed for daily living and working.
Usually appointed by the government (but with a significant degree of independence), this individual is charged with representing the interests of the public by investigating and addressing complaints of maladministration or violation of rights in the long term care industry.
A licensed physician working closely with associates in a skilled nursing facility to provide increased accessibility to residents and patients.
The branch of medicine dealing with the skeleton, joints, muscles and other related structures.
The branch of rehabilitation therapy dealing with the skeleton, joints, muscles and other related structures.
A disorder caused by the abnormal loss of bone density, osteoporosis causes bones to become increasingly brittle, porous and likely to fracture due to lack of calcium and other minerals. It occurs most frequently in postmenopausal women.
A surgically created hole or opening in the abdomen where the small or large intestine is attached to the surface to remove waste.
A form of therapy where patients travel to a clinic to attend sessions and then return home the same day.

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A branch of medicine employing an interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those living with pain.
Specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses. It focuses on providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain and stress of a serious illness-whatever the diagnosis. The goal is to improve quality of life for both the patient and the family.
Also known as idiopathic or primary parkinsonism, hypokinetic rigid syndrome/HRS, or paralysis agitans, PD is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease result from the death of dopamine-generating cells in the substantia nigra, a region of the midbrain; the cause of this cell death is unknown.
The therapeutic treatment of peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is a result of nerve damage and often causes weakness, numbness and pain, usually in the hands and feet, but it may also occur in other areas of the body.
A type of anemia (low red blood cell count) caused by the body's inability to absorb vitamin B12.
The use of domesticated animals as a method to improve and enhance physical, mental and emotional well-being.
Therapists who specialize in muscle development and motor coordination. PTs typically plan exercise programs and give advice on sports and activities. The physical therapist may use ultrasound, water therapy, massage or other methods to improve joints and muscles.
Certified assistants who provide physical therapy services under the direction and supervision of a licensed physical therapist. PTAs help people of all ages who have medical problems, or other health-related conditions that limit their ability to move and perform functional activities in their daily lives.
A branch of medicine devoted to the study, diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of disorders of the foot, ankle and lower extremities.
A special level of care not offered at acute-care hospitals. When patients require post-acute care, they are transferred to a facility where the care is tailored to their individual goals. A team of health care professionals, including rehabilitation specialists, works with the patient and his or her family to ensure their goals for recovery are achieved.
An artificial device that replaces a missing body part lost through trauma, disease or congenital conditions.

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A dynamic program used to quantify the discharge plans and to keep family members and patient involved in the plan of care and case management process.
A nurse who has graduated from a nursing program at a college or university and has passed a national licensing exam. A registered nurse's scope of practice is determined by the school and by the government responsible for health care in the region. These bodies outline what is legal practice for registered nurses and what tasks they may or may not perform. In general, registered nurses help individuals, families, and groups to achieve health and prevent disease.
An internal quality assurance program created by Life Care Centers of America. The purpose is to routinely review the rehabilitation program in each facility in order to identify strengths and areas of opportunity. Facilities with the highest quality results from this inspection are approved to develop a specialty therapy program, enabling them to be designated as a Rehab Center of Excellence.
Programs which help patients adjust to health problems or disablement and return to a full, productive life. Rehabilitation may involve physical restoration, such as the use of prostheses, or emotional help such as counseling and providing emotional support.
Any disease or disorder that affects the kidneys.
The health care discipline that specializes in the promotion of optimum cardiopulmonary function and health. Respiratory therapists apply scientific principles to prevent, identify and treat acute or chronic dysfunction of the cardiopulmonary system. Their knowledge of the scientific principles underlying cardiopulmonary physiology and pathophysiology, as well as biomedical engineering and technology, enable them to effectively assess, educate and treat patients with cardiopulmonary disorders.
Temporary, short-term care provided to individuals with disabilities. Respite care allows family members to take a break from caregiving. Respite care is available in adult day care, assisted living or nursing home settings.
A program designed to support each resident in maintaining the functional gains made in physical, occupational and speech therapy.
Condition in which a portion of the retina becomes separated from the inner wall of the eye. Flashes of light, floating spots and sometimes loss of side vision are the classic warning signs of a detached retina.
Generally an apartment or residential facility that caters to those who are retired. Additional facilities are often provided within the building, including facilities for meals, gathering, recreation, and some form of health or hospice care.

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A medical device manufacturer of neurological orthotic devices, allowing stroke survivors and other neurologically impaired patients to immediately begin performing task-oriented grasp-and-release activities. SaeboFlex, SaeboReach, SaeboMAS and SaeboReJoyce can help patients regain their independence and peace of mind.
A lifestyle characterized by sitting or remaining inactive for most of the day (for example, sitting in front of the TV all day). It is believed to be a factor in obesity, and, in turn, may contribute to other diseases, such as type II diabetes, heart disease, depression and even hemorrhoids.
A form of the chicken pox virus that remains inactive in nerve cells next to the spinal cord, sometimes for decades. When the virus becomes active again, it travels down the nerve fibers that extend to the skin, and a painful rash develops.
A therapy program to help patients achieve their maximum functional capacity and get back to their homes and community in the shortest time possible. Generally, those needing short-term, inpatient rehabilitation may remain involved in their program at a facility for as little as a couple of days to as many as several weeks. Short-term rehabilitation facilities provide therapy for individuals recovering from a surgery, illness or accident.
A facility providing lodging and 24-hour skilled nursing services to those requiring post-acute care due to decreased ability to perform activities of daily living. Services provided range from long-term care to short-term rehabilitation. Sometimes called a nursing home or convalescent home. It is the third level of care in the continuum of care for people, after independent living and assisted living care.
An impaired or altered function of related components of the somatic (body framework) system.
A health professional trained to evaluate and treat people who have voice, speech, language or swallowing disorders - including hearing impairment - that affect their ability to communicate. Sometimes called a speech-language pathologist.
A health professional trained to evaluate and treat people who have voice, speech, language or swallowing disorders - including hearing impairment - that affect their ability to communicate. Sometimes called a speech therapist.
Sometimes referred to by the older term cerebrovascular accident (CVA), a stroke is the rapid loss of brain function due to disturbance in the blood supply to the brain. This can be due to ischemia (lack of blood flow) caused by blockage (thrombosis, arterial embolism, blood cot) or a hemorrhage. As a result, the affected area of the brain cannot function, which might result in an inability to move one or more limbs on one side of the body, inability to understand or formulate speech or an inability to see one side of the visual field.
A special level of care not offered at acute-care hospitals. When patients require post-acute care, they are transferred to a facility where the care is tailored to their individual goals. A team of health care professionals, including rehabilitation specialists, works with the patient and his or her family to ensure their goals for recovery are achieved.
A person who has lived to the age of 110 or more (also see Centenarian).

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Inflammation of a tendon, usually caused by injury, which may restrict movement of the muscle attached to the tendon.
A line of progressive elastic resistance exercise products, including latex and latex-free bands, natural rubber tubing, exercise balls, hand exercisers, flexible bars, exercise mats, stability trainers, aquatic exercise products, specialized exercise kits and paraffin heat therapy.
Care in which a patient is fed intravenously, bypassing the usual process of eating and digestion.
A surgical procedure to create an opening through the neck into the trachea (windpipe). A tube is usually placed through this opening to provide an airway and to remove secretions from the lungs.
Fats that are artificially created through a chemical process of the hydrogenation of oils. These fats are considered to be the most harmful to one's health.

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The use of ultrasonic sounds or waves for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.

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An FDA-approved neuromuscular electrical system that helps to stimulate inactive swallowing muscles in the throat used to treat dysphagia.

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A rare disorder characterized by the dramatic, rapid appearance of aging.